New Mexico is a great big brown baked potato

Acrylics, Art, Encaustic Wax, Inspiration

This is a short story on how this painting got its’ name. It began in 1981. When photos were taken with film cameras.

While some people might think that New Mexico looks like a great big brown baked potato, I think otherwise. Colors in the rocks, the sunsets, and landscape. Magnificent.

The painting started out as “The Draw” based on Blackwater Draw in New Mexcio. It landed on the canvas in 2011 with a monochrome under painting of burnt umber. I started it upside down because the perspective was challenging me. This way my brain would only see shapes. Other colors were going to be added, but we moved. And moved again. I kind of liked it with the one color.

2015 – This painting wanted attention. Encaustic wax called to me. I brushed the wax over the top very lightly and only heated it enough to adhere the layers. The sand is silica from those little packets that come in pills. In writing on the very last layer is “New Mexico is a great big brown baked potato” in oil pastels. This piece flowed out of me and I enjoyed the process.

 

 

Painting outside for the first time

Art, En Plein Air, Inspiration, Pastel

Well. This wasn’t the first time I ever painted outside, but it might have well been since it had been 30 plus years since my college days. It was the most satisfying and wonderful experience. The birds sang all day. The sun was shining through the trees. I was connecting with this Chinese Maple tree and its’ surroundings.

An interesting side note:

It’s funny, when you are an artist people say whatever comes to their mind. It’s as if you belong to them. They have no filter because of that. It’s as if you’re pregnant and everyone wants to touch your belly.

When other artists saw this tree, they said things like “I had no idea you could paint like that.” I’m on a journey and exploring encaustics on cigar boxes and painting night scenes with pastel. This is a good reminder not to judge others by what you see.

I painted this tree during the Paint Out Lynchburg in the Old City Cemetery this past May. I’ve been hooked ever since.

Why Not Paint Tadpoles?

Acrylics, Art, Inspiration, Pastel

I drew and painted as a child all the time. I drew and painted in my art courses at college. Broadcasting got a hold of me and two or three television stations later and I stopped painting.

Twenty years later I picked up a brush again and didn’t know where to begin…again. The first attempt was to throw paint on the canvas making swirls and adding objects, it seemed so flat otherwise. The colors popped! It didn’t mean anything. It was happy, but just a bunch of doodles.

Gesso is an artists’ friend. Goodbye swirls, hello circles. Still…flat. Some of those circles looked like breasts with the objects in the middle.

As I am always photographing micro shots of critters,  I posted these tadpoles stuck in a tide pool on Facebook and a friend inspired me with “You should paint them”. The colors were vibrate, the composition flowed. A 3′ by 5′ painting of tadpoles emerged. Right over all those swirls/circles. I experimented with pastels combined with gel medium. Acrylics. Overall, it was a satisfying experience. This is the journey.

 

 

Encaustic Wax – The Asphalt

Art, Citrasolve, Encaustic Wax, Inspiration, Photography

 

Abstract art requires work and thought. This is the biggest encaustic piece I’ve ever done. In walking around my neighborhood, it had just finished raining and I noticed the pattern in the asphalt. This pattern intrigued and inspired me. I would go to sleep thinking of this piece, creating it, dreaming of it. I gesso’d the panel and drew on it with a charcoal stick and just filled the pattern with paper. I scraped and painted. So mesmerizing. The paper is from National Geographic magazines pages soaked in Citrasolve. The patterns and hidden pictures came alive as I built the layers.

It’s a little brighter than this picture. 20″ x 36″ encaustic on a panel.